5 GENIUSES WHO SUPPORTED A MEAT FREE DIET // Inspiration

Albert Einstein

‘I have long been an adherent to the cause [vegetarianism] in principle. Besides agreeing with the aims of vegetarianism for aesthetic and moral reasons, it is my view that a vegetarian manner of living by its purely physical effect on the human temperament would most beneficially influence the lot of mankind.’

  •  Translation of letter to Hermann Huth, December 27, 1930. Einstein Archive 46-756

‘So I am living without fats, without meat, without fish, but am feeling quite well this way. It always seems to me that man was not born to be a carnivore’

  • diary extract (disclaimer, I don’t think anyone would recommend a diet free of fats, and meat free diets should still get plenty of fats from nuts, seeds, avacados, free range eggs, etc)

Charles Darwin

‘I have always been astonished at the fact that the most extraordinary workers I ever saw, viz., the laborers in the mines of Chili, live exclusively on vegetable food, which includes many seeds of the leguminous plants’

  • received from a reader who wrote to Darwin enquiring for evidence in favour of evidence for a vegetarian diet, from a German vegetarian journal

Thomas Edison

‘[Vegetarianism has a] powerful influence upon the mind and its action, as well as upon the health and vigor of the body. Until we stop harming all other living beings, we are still savages’

Ghandi

‘I do not regard flesh food as necessary for us. I hold flesh food to be unsuited to our species’

‘To my mind, the life of a lamb is no less precious than that of a human being. I should be unwilling to take the life of a lamb for the sake of the human body’

Leornado da Vinci

‘The mere idea of permitting the existence of unnecessary suffering, still more that of taking life, was abhorrent to him. Vasari tells, as an instance of his love of animals, how when in Florence he passed places where birds were sold he would frequently take them from their cages with his own hand, and having paid the sellers the price that was asked would let them fly away in the air, thus giving them back their liberty.’

 

I’m not stating that any of these were 100% vegan (besides, imagine how hard it would have been to find a raw vegan salad in the 1700’s), but there is solid evidence that they all at least supported the view that a reduction in meat and animal consumption would do alot of good for both people, animals, and the world around them.